26 Dec 2015

Stranger agrees to fly baby fighting cancer for treatment over 1,000 miles in personal jet after finding out the family couldn't fly commercially because of the baby's immune system.

A Franklinton family is getting what they’re calling a Christmas miracle.
Their 8-month-old son, a patient at Children’s Hospital, is supposed to start a new cancer treatment in Baltimore.
“He’s given everyone strength,” said mother Brittany Self.
Both Brittany and her husband Tylan say their son Jett is a fighter.
“He’s a miracle baby, that’s for sure,” she said.
Jett was born with a rare form of Leukemia.
“It’s a day I’ll never forget, probably the scariest day of my life,” said Brittany.
“It almost doesn’t seem real,” said Tylan. “I didn’t know a baby could be born with Leukemia, but when a doctor comes in and tells you, it’s something that’s hard to believe.”
For the past (almost) nine months, each day has been spent at Children’s Hospital. Brittany will usually stay with Jett, while Tylan goes back-and-forth from work, their house (to take care of their 2-year-old), and Children’s.
“You know, daddy is supposed to protect him,” Tylan said with emotion.
Doctors say they’ve done what they can.
“He’s been doing a very intensive Chemotherapy, because this is a very difficult form of Leukemia to treat,” said attending physician Renee Gardner.”Most kids are older when they’re diagnosed, and he was diagnosed at birth. To see him not going into remission has been very difficult.”
After months at Children’s Hospital, Jett hasn’t responded to treatment. His parents, though, found a trial that unfortunately is more than 1,100 miles way, in Baltimore.
“We’re hoping it’ll work in Jett’s case,” said Gardner. “This isn’t available everywhere, it’s an experimental treatment, and John’s Hopkins has it and we want him to get it.”
Jett’s parents say this trial is a last effort for their son. Getting there, they say, isn’t easy.
“We can’t go commercial because his immune system is very low,” said Brittany. “Being around the holiday, with public airports so crowded, just a simple common cold that you and I may get, can be fatal to him.”
“It’s about a 16-hour drive,” said Tylan. “But we’d have to stop every two hours for him to eat, it’s just too long for him.”
The trial starts Monday, and finding someone willing to use their private aircraft to help the Self’s has proven to be difficult. However, just days before the trial starts, a stranger from Ruston, La., gives hope.
“It’s a blessing,” said Tylan.
“Davison Trucking is offering a personal jet,” Tiffany said. “They don’t know us, they didn’t have to do that. We’re very thankful.”
The stranger is James Davison. He tells Eyewitness News he’s glad to help.
“My Congressman, Dr. Ralph Abraham, called me and made me aware of this family,” he said. “I understand the father is helping serve our country in the National Guard. The congressman and I used to be in The Guard and we just are happy to help this child at this particular time.”
Davison said he doesn’t know the family, but when he heard about the situation, he wanted to help.

0 comments:

Post a Comment