14 May 2015

A Navy nurse who refused to force feed prisoners on hunger strike at the U.S. base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is no longer facing an administrative discharge over his protest, his lawyer said Wednesday

A Navy nurse who refused to force feed prisoners on hunger strike at the U.S. base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is no longer facing an administrative discharge over his protest, his lawyer said Wednesday.
The commanding officer of Navy personnel rejected a commander's recommendation that the nurse appear before a board of inquiry that could have resulted in his removal from the military after an 18-year career, attorney Ronald Meister said.
Instead, the nurse, whose name has not been released, will be allowed to resume work.
"He is extremely relieved," Meister said in an interview. "He is anxious to get back to work and complete an honorable career."
The Navy confirmed the decision in a brief statement but provided no details. Meister said he was not told why the military declined to pursue the matter.
The nurse is assigned to the New England Naval Clinic, which has its headquarters in Newport, Rhode Island, and operates a network of clinics in the U.S. Northeast.
Meister said the nurse, who previously served as an enlisted sailor on a submarine, volunteered for a six-month assignment at Guantanamo, where military personnel provide health care to the men who have been detained for suspected links to al-Qaida or the Taliban since January 2002.
In July 2014, his assignment was cut short and he was sent home after he declined to take part in force feeding prisoners on hunger strike, citing his professional ethics. Hundreds of medical personnel have served at the detention center and officials have said he is the only one to refuse to participate in the procedure, though his ethical objection has been backed by the American Nurses Association, Physicians for Human Rights and other groups.
The lawyer says the nurse's views on the matter evolved after seeing the procedure and have not waivered as the military weighed both criminal and administrative penalties against him. "He continues to believe that involuntary force feeding of competent adult patients is contrary to medical ethics," Meister said.
Prisoners at Guantanamo have protested their confinement with hunger strikes since shortly after the detention center opened on the base. In early 2006, as some men grew dangerously undernourished, the military began restraining them in a specially designed chair and administering liquid nutrients directly to their stomachs through a flexible nasal tube.

1 comment:

  1. I'm glad to see there is at least one individual with a sense of ethics intact. The shame is that he's the only one.

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