27 Nov 2014

Australian scientists are developing wind turbines that are one-third the price and 1,000 times more efficient than anything currently on the market to install along the country's windy and abundant coast.

New superconductor-powered wind turbines could be installed off the coast of Australia within the next five years to finally take advantage of the country’s 35,000 km of coastline, which offers up some of the best wind resources in the world.
Developed by a team at the Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials at the University of Wollongong in New South Wales, the wind turbines are a significant improvement on current technology. Right now, wind turbines cost about $15 million each to construct, and are super-heavy and tough to ship. They also require a whole lot of maintenance because they're run using a complex, heavy, and costly piece of machinery called a gear box.
“In our design there is no gear box, which right away reduces the size and weight by 40 percent,” said lead researcher and materials scientist Shahriar Hossain. “We are developing a magnesium diboride superconducting coil to replace the gear box. This will capture the wind energy and convert it into electricity without any power loss, and will reduce manufacturing and maintenance costs by two thirds.”
Superconductors are a class of materials that have been getting a lot of attention this year due to their potential to completely revolutionise power systems and batteries as we know them. Right now, these systems generate power by running an electric current through a copper conduction loop, but during this process up to 10 percent of the energy is lost due to resistance. This, and the fact that the copper wire decays quickly, means our current power systems are relatively inefficient with short lifespans.
But superconducting materials generate no electrical resistance, which means they're able to store electricity with no loss of energy. The current is also able to circulate over and over indefinitely, even if power is turned off. The Australian team is making their superconducting coil out of magnesium and boron, both of which are cheap, durable and easy to make. 
The team estimates that their superconductor wind turbines will cost just $3-5 million each to build, because by next year, the magnesium diboride coil will cost just $1 per metre to manufacture.

13 comments:

  1. What's a bet they cost the same amount by time they get planted in the ground.

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  2. Pissed off American are you? What do you manufacture these days except war machinery?

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  3. errm they also manufacture elections, voting machines, propaganda (probably the most advanced in the world). I'm pretty sure they manufactured Myley Cyrus in a test tube, oh and they still manufacture mountain dew last time I checked, with more caffiene in it than the same vol of coffee.

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  4. Jct: A third cheaper and 1,000 times better! I like 3,000-fold increases in efficiency. Always loved wind power since the days of wind-mills.

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  5. Hey JollySwagman! As an American whose family has been here for four centuries (and that is only counting the European side of the clan) I have to..... agree with you. Our political system, financial system, and many of our cultural institutions have been taken over and turned against us. Most of my fellow Americans are just sleep-walking through life these days, ready to buy any worthless trinket they see on TV, ready to hate any imaginary enemy they are told is a threat.



    A half century ago, when I was a child, my brother and I used to wonder about what happened to Germany before World War II. "How could everybody have just gone along with the Nazis? Didn't they see what was happening?!" In the last twenty years, I have seen how the trick is done.

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  6. "1000 times more efficient" So, the turbines in use now are either 0.03% efficient or the new ones will be 30,000% efficient, with 100% being more than is possible according to current laws of physics. Are these the same people who invented HHO generators for vehicles that (supposedly) produce more power than is put into them?

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  7. Bear in mind that the only thing you think you know about "the Nazis" (including the 6 million holocaust myth) was planted in your brain by a Western news media (MSM) that's wholly owned and controlled by Jews.

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  8. Assume a 20km/h wind produces 5 watts with current technology from a single windmill and the new improved version produces 5KW. Assume blade sizes the same.
    What would you calculate was the increase in efficiency?
    Does not have to be the mechanical increase.

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  9. Jct: I guess you didn't notice turbine efficiency isn't where they made their quantum leap. Re-read the article and figure out what, if not the turbine design, was improved for their claim to fame? Then we'll discuss whether their real claim, not your presumed one, is valid.

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  10. I was an American manufacturer until I decided it wasn't worth being productive any more when the taxes I paid supported a police state at home and wars for empire abroad. So I shut down completely. As the Zionist control parasite finishes killing its host in the US, I see Australia and Canada increasingly being taken down the same road. Watch out!

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  11. Thirty years ago I attended a lecture on alternative energy given by J. Baldwin, an early wind power advocate and editor at Whole Earth Review. One of the things he said stuck with me: If one of the most popular small wind generators at that time could run full blast for twenty years (an impossibility, of course) it would generate enough electricity to smelt the copper for the windings. It's all about EROEI (energy return on energy invested), folks. Let's hope these new generators finally break the EROEI barrier and actually start contributing to global energy stocks instead of sucking up energy during manufacture and then never paying it back.

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  12. Having reread the article and the linked article,I have no idea what you are talking about.
    There is no reference to "Quantum" or "leaps" the "1000 times" is only in the headlines, i.e. an editors attempt to grab attention, and the article makes no "claims" only provides data.
    Apart from that you are absolutely correct, although why I would want to have a "discussion" with a condescending creep, escapes me.

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  13. Christopher Harrison6 December 2014 at 04:31

    Sounds like hippie in the 80's in Nimbin NSW who told me about this device he'd made that produced endless energy, for free, forever. When I said it sounded like a perpetual motion machine he looked at me and furiously agreed. I just walked away, he clearly had no clue at all.

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