29 Jul 2015

Dispatcher tells 911 caller, 'deal with it yourself'

A New Mexico dispatcher has resigned after telling a panicked 911 caller who was trying to save the life of a shooting victim to "deal with it yourself."
Matthew Sanchez was reassigned after officials became aware of the call, fire officials said on Monday. But a statement Tuesday evening from the office of Albuquerque's chief administrative officer said that Sanchez has resigned from the fire department.
The call was made after Jaydon Chavez-Silver, 17, was shot in June as he watched other teens play cards at a friend's house in Albuquerque. He later died. Police have not named a suspect and have made no arrests.
In the recording obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press, the panicked caller snaps at the dispatcher for repeatedly asking whether Chavez-Silver is breathing.
During the call, the female says, "I am keeping him alive!"
Sanchez asks, "Is he not breathing?"
The caller responds, "Barely!"
She is then heard frantically encouraging Chavez-Silver to keep breathing.
"One more breath! One more breath!" she is heard telling the teen. "There you go Jaydon. One more breath! There you go Jaydon. Good job! Just stay with me, OK? OK?"
The dispatcher then asks again, "Is he breathing?"
The female responded, "He is barely breathing, how many times do I have to (expletive) tell you?" 
"OK, you know what ma'am? You can deal with it yourself. I am not going to deal with this, OK?" the dispatcher says.
It seemed from the tape that Sanchez hung up on the caller in mid-sentence.
"No, my friend is dying .," she said as the call ended.
___
This story has been corrected to say a dispatcher, not a firefighter, took the 911 call, and that the dispatcher told the caller to "deal with it yourself," not "herself."

Man arrested for shooting down drone; cites right to privacy

A Hillview man has been arrested after he shot down a drone flying over his property -- but he's not making any apologies for it.
It happened Sunday night at a home on Earlywood Way, just south of the intersection between Smith Lane and Mud Lane in Bullitt County, according to an arrest report.
Hillview Police say they were called to the home of 47-year-old William H. Merideth after someone complained about a firearm.
When they arrived, police say Merideth told them he had shot down a drone that was flying over his house. The drone was hit in mid-air and crashed in a field near Merideth's home.
Police say the owner of the drone claimed he was flying it to get pictures of a friend's house -- and that the cost of the drone was over $1,800.
Merideth was arrested and charged with first degree criminal mischief and first degree wanton endangerment. He was booked into the Bullitt County Detention Center, and released on Monday.
WDRB News spoke with Merideth Tuesday afternoon, and he gave his side of the story.
"Sunday afternoon, the kids – my girls – were out on the back deck, and the neighbors were out in their yard," Merideth said. "And they come in and said, 'Dad, there’s a drone out here, flying over everybody’s yard.'"
Merideth's neighbors saw it too.
"It was just hovering above our house and it stayed for a few moments and then she finally waved and it took off," said neighbor Kim VanMeter.
VanMeter has a 16-year-old daughter who lays out at their pool. She says a drone hovering with a camera is creepy and weird.
"I just think you should have privacy in your own backyard," she said.
Merideth agrees and said he had to go see for himself.
“Well, I came out and it was down by the neighbor’s house, about 10 feet off the ground, looking under their canopy that they’ve got under their back yard," Merideth said. "I went and got my shotgun and I said, ‘I’m not going to do anything unless it’s directly over my property.’"
That moment soon arrived, he said.
"Within a minute or so, here it came," he said. "It was hovering over top of my property, and I shot it out of the sky."
"I didn't shoot across the road, I didn't shoot across my neighbor's fences, I shot directly into the air," he added.
It wasn't long before the drone's owners appeared.
"Four guys came over to confront me about it, and I happened to be armed, so that changed their minds," Merideth said.
"They asked me, 'Are you the S-O-B that shot my drone?' and I said, 'Yes I am,'" he said. "I had my 40mm Glock on me and they started toward me and I told them, 'If you cross my sidewalk, there's gonna be another shooting.'"
A short time later, Merideth said the police arrived.
"There were some words exchanged there about my weapon, and I was open carry – it was completely legal," he said. "Long story short, after that, they took me to jail for wanton endangerment first degree and criminal mischief...because I fired the shotgun into the air."
Merideth said he was disappointed with the police response.
"They didn’t confiscate the drone. They gave the drone back to the individuals," he said. "They didn’t take the SIM card out of it…but we’ve got…five houses here that everyone saw it – they saw what happened, including the neighbors that were sitting in their patio when he flew down low enough to see under the patio."
Hillview Police detective Charles McWhirter of says you can't fire your gun in the city.
"Well, we do have a city ordinance against discharging firearms in the city, but the officer made an arrest for a Kentucky Revised Statute violation," he said.
According to the Academy of Model Aeronautics safety code, unmanned aircraft like drones may not be flown in a careless or reckless manner and has to be launched at least 100 feet downwind of spectators.
The FAA says drones cannot fly over buildings -- and that shooting them poses a significant safety hazard.
"An unmanned aircraft hit by gunfire could crash, causing damage to persons or property on the ground, or it could collide with other objects in the air," said FAA spokesman Les Dorr.
Merideth said he's offering no apologies for what he did.
"He didn’t just fly over," he said. "If he had been moving and just kept moving, that would have been one thing -- but when he come directly over our heads, and just hovered there, I felt like I had the right."
"You know, when you’re in your own property, within a six-foot privacy fence, you have the expectation of privacy," he said. "We don't know if he was looking at the girls. We don’t know if he was looking for something to steal. To me, it was the same as trespassing."

Mathematician says Kansas voting machines need to be audited

A mathematician at Wichita State University who wanted to check the accuracy of some Kansas voting machines after finding odd patterns in election returns said she is finding out how difficult it can be to get government officials to turn over public documents.
Beth Clarkson, a certified quality engineer with a doctorate in statistics, said her calculations from the November election showed enough patterns to suspect that “some voting systems were being sabotaged.”
Sedgwick County election officials refused to allow the computer records to be part of a recount and told her that to get paper recordings of votes, she would have to go to court and fight for them, said Clarkson, who is also the chief statistician for WSU’s National Institute for Aviation Research.
She filed a lawsuit against the Sedgwick County Election Office and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach earlier this year, asking for access to the paper records that voting machines record each time someone votes. The record does not identify the voter.
The voting machines that Sedgwick County uses have a paper record of the votes, known as Real Time Voting Machine Paper Tapes, which similar machines in Kansas and around the country do not have. Because the software is proprietary, even elections officials can’t examine it and postelection audits can’t be done, according to Pamela Smith, president of Verified Voting Foundation, a nonprofit agency whose mission is to safeguard elections in the digital age.
Clarkson asked Sedgwick County to do a recount in 2013 but the time to file had expired. She then filed an open records request, but officials refused to provide the requested documents. She filed a lawsuit but the judge said the paper records were ballots, even though they didn’t identify the voter, and thus were not subject to the state’s open records law.
Clarkson filed for a recount after the November election, but Sedgwick County officials again refused, saying only a judge could release the records.
A lawsuit she filed in February against Kansas’ attorney general – and later amended to add the Sedgwick County election commissioner and Kobach – sought a court order giving her access to a certain number of voting records to conduct an audit.
She mailed it to the Sedgwick County election commissioner and Kobach, who under state law had 30 days to respond. Neither responded, later saying they weren’t aware they’d received the summons.




Read more here: http://www.kansas.com/news/politics-government/article27951310.html#storylink=cpy

NYC Street Photos in Which Every Stranger is Staring at the Photographer

Photographer Nathan Bett has an unusual series of photos titled Learning to Disappear, which shows New Yorkers walking by in various parts of their city. What curious about the images, however, is that most of the passers-by in the frames are staring straight at Bett’s camera.

Bett writes that when he moved from Detroit to Brooklyn, New York, he arrived in his new city with great expectations about how his personal street photography work would develop.
“My bubble was soon burst,” he says. “Street photography in New York is a tough, tough thing.” Many people he encountered would give looks of distrust and hostility when they noticed Bett taking pictures of them.
learningtodisappaer7
Photographer Nathan Bett has an unusual series of photos titled Learning to Disappear, which shows New Yorkers walking by in various parts of their city. What curious about the images, however, is that most of the passers-by in the frames are staring straight at Bett’s camera.

In a post over at Medium, Bett writes that when he moved from Detroit to Brooklyn, New York, he arrived in his new city with great expectations about how his personal street photography work would develop.
“My bubble was soon burst,” he says. “Street photography in New York is a tough, tough thing.” Many people he encountered would give looks of distrust and hostility when they noticed Bett taking pictures of them.
learningtodisappaer8
After repeatedly receiving these sideways glances from his subjects, Bett’s mentality shifted from trying to make photos about New York streets to making photos about street photography itself.
The photos in Learning to Disappear aren’t actual photos taken straight out of his camera. They’re actually composite photos that combine multiple images captured with a camera that was fixed in one place.
By combining many of the looks he received into single frames, Bett is attempting to “distill New Yorkers’ curiosity, distrust, and hostility toward the camera.”
Thus, the project is about “the way in which people react to having their photograph taken, candidly, by a stranger, and without their consent.”







The Rich History of Soviet Photography, Told in 18 Images

















NYC Street Photos in Which Every Stranger is Staring at the Photographer

Photographer Nathan Bett has an unusual series of photos titled Learning to Disappear, which shows New Yorkers walking by in various parts of their city. What curious about the images, however, is that most of the passers-by in the frames are staring straight at Bett’s camera.

Bett writes that when he moved from Detroit to Brooklyn, New York, he arrived in his new city with great expectations about how his personal street photography work would develop.
“My bubble was soon burst,” he says. “Street photography in New York is a tough, tough thing.” Many people he encountered would give looks of distrust and hostility when they noticed Bett taking pictures of them.
learningtodisappaer7
Photographer Nathan Bett has an unusual series of photos titled Learning to Disappear, which shows New Yorkers walking by in various parts of their city. What curious about the images, however, is that most of the passers-by in the frames are staring straight at Bett’s camera.

In a post over at Medium, Bett writes that when he moved from Detroit to Brooklyn, New York, he arrived in his new city with great expectations about how his personal street photography work would develop.
“My bubble was soon burst,” he says. “Street photography in New York is a tough, tough thing.” Many people he encountered would give looks of distrust and hostility when they noticed Bett taking pictures of them.
learningtodisappaer8
After repeatedly receiving these sideways glances from his subjects, Bett’s mentality shifted from trying to make photos about New York streets to making photos about street photography itself.
The photos in Learning to Disappear aren’t actual photos taken straight out of his camera. They’re actually composite photos that combine multiple images captured with a camera that was fixed in one place.
By combining many of the looks he received into single frames, Bett is attempting to “distill New Yorkers’ curiosity, distrust, and hostility toward the camera.”
Thus, the project is about “the way in which people react to having their photograph taken, candidly, by a stranger, and without their consent.”







Heroin addict asks Youngstown judge to send her to jail to get clean: "There's a three-month waiting list for any rehab around here because of the heroin epidemic. It was faster to go to jail."

Heroin.  It's a drug with an addiction so powerful that one Youngstown woman begged a Judge to send her to jail just so she could get clean.
"There's no help out there anymore.  There's a three-month waiting list for any rehab around here because of the heroin epidemic.  It was faster to go to jail."
Determined to get her life back, as well as her three-year-old son, 25-year-old Kayla Dempsey made a desperate and somewhat unusual decision.  The admitted heroin addict pleaded guilty to possession of a drug instrument and requested that Youngstown Judge Elizabeth Kobly throw her in jail for 30 days so she could get clean.
"There's people somewhere, there has to be people somewhere that are willing to help.  Judge Kobly is not known for her kindness.  I was not expecting her to agree to 30 days, and when she did I felt so blessed.  And I knew right then and there somebody cares," Dempsey said.
The Austintown woman says she first became addicted at 18, and was able to clean herself up for 5 years. But it's when she was prescribed pain killers and ran out that the need for heroin surfaced.
"You don't feel anything.  You don't feel no physical pain, you don't feel no emotional pain.  Nothing but a super euphoric just happy feeling," Dempsey said.
Dempsey says she's watched friends die waiting for detox beds to open, and knew this time for her this could be a matter of life or death.
"Jail's maybe not the best place to detox but it was my fastest option.  With the Warren and Trumbull County scare and all the bad drugs going around, I didn't want to risk it no more," Dempsey said.

27 Jul 2015

This Camper Is Perfect For Working In The Woods (8 pics)

Do you have a lot of work to do but just want some peace and quiet? The Kantoor Karavaan has everything that you need. It was designed by a company in Netherlands as a place that could be your office away from home.








Caring Volunteers Help Beached Orca Whale Survive During Low Tide (6 pics)

This orca whale was stranded on the shores of British Columbia during low tide and a group of volunteers spent 8 hours keeping the sea mammal wet until the tide was high enough for it to swim back to safety.